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The Irish Emigration in the Middle Europe and the Family of Taafe
dc.contributor.advisorŽupanič, Jan
dc.creatorBeštová, Veronika
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-27T18:34:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-27T18:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/72209
dc.description.abstractThe work is focused on the fate of Irish emigration to Central Europe (the Habsburg monarchy) during the 16th and 17th centuries and its subsequent fate in this region. Particular attention is paid to the family of the Counts Taaffe, who especially in the 19th century significantly influenced politics in the Austrian Empire. Irish emigration in the 17th and 18th century can be divided into three major waves. The first hit after the defeat of Ireland Ulster insurgents in Kinsale. Local elites were not willing to accept a subordinate position and four years after the signing of. Mellifontské contract went 30 September 1607 more than ninety Ulstr for the most important nobles in exile. This "escape poke" had far-reaching consequences for Ireland and has contributed greatly to the realization of England's plans. The second and most extensive emigration met Ireland after the Armistice in Kilkeny in May 1652, ie during the era of Oliver Cromwel. The third wave of emigration then caused the victory of William of Orange over James II. in the battle of the Boyne in 1690 and Aughrimu the 1691. Most Irish emigrants resorted to the Catholic powers, particularly Spain, France and Austria. They can be roughly divided into three groups. First it was the Catholic priests, mainly members of the Franciscan order....cs_CZ
dc.description.abstractThe work is focused on the fate of Irish emigration to Central Europe (the Habsburg monarchy) during the 16th and 17th centuries and its subsequent fate in this region. Particular attention is paid to the family of the Counts Taaffe, who especially in the 19th century significantly influenced politics in the Austrian Empire. Irish emigration in the 17th and 18th century can be divided into three major waves. The first hit after the defeat of Ireland Ulster insurgents in Kinsale. Local elites were not willing to accept a subordinate position and four years after the signing of. Mellifontské contract went 30 September 1607 more than ninety Ulstr for the most important nobles in exile. This "escape poke" had far-reaching consequences for Ireland and has contributed greatly to the realization of England's plans. The second and most extensive emigration met Ireland after the Armistice in Kilkeny in May 1652, ie during the era of Oliver Cromwel. The third wave of emigration then caused the victory of William of Orange over James II. in the battle of the Boyne in 1690 and Aughrimu the 1691. Most Irish emigrants resorted to the Catholic powers, particularly Spain, France and Austria. They can be roughly divided into three groups. First it was the Catholic priests, mainly members of the Franciscan order....en_US
dc.languageČeštinacs_CZ
dc.language.isocs_CZ
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.subjectIrskocs_CZ
dc.subjectemigracecs_CZ
dc.subjectHabsburská monarchiecs_CZ
dc.subjectcírkevcs_CZ
dc.subjectšlechtacs_CZ
dc.subjectTaaffecs_CZ
dc.subjectIrelanden_US
dc.subjectemigrationen_US
dc.subjectHabsburg monarchyen_US
dc.subjectchurchen_US
dc.subjectnobilityen_US
dc.subjectTaaffeen_US
dc.titleIrská emigrace ve střední Evropě a rod Taafecs_CZ
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2014
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09-18
dc.description.departmentInstitute of General Historyen_US
dc.description.departmentÚstav světových dějincs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Artsen_US
dc.identifier.repId73181
dc.title.translatedThe Irish Emigration in the Middle Europe and the Family of Taafeen_US
dc.contributor.refereeHorčička, Václav
dc.identifier.aleph001854328
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelmagisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEtnologie - Historiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEthnology - Historyen_US
thesis.degree.programHistorické vědycs_CZ
thesis.degree.programHistoryen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Artsen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFFcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csEtnologie - Historiecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enEthnology - Historyen_US
uk.degree-program.csHistorické vědycs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enHistoryen_US
thesis.grade.csDobřecs_CZ
thesis.grade.enGooden_US
uk.abstract.csThe work is focused on the fate of Irish emigration to Central Europe (the Habsburg monarchy) during the 16th and 17th centuries and its subsequent fate in this region. Particular attention is paid to the family of the Counts Taaffe, who especially in the 19th century significantly influenced politics in the Austrian Empire. Irish emigration in the 17th and 18th century can be divided into three major waves. The first hit after the defeat of Ireland Ulster insurgents in Kinsale. Local elites were not willing to accept a subordinate position and four years after the signing of. Mellifontské contract went 30 September 1607 more than ninety Ulstr for the most important nobles in exile. This "escape poke" had far-reaching consequences for Ireland and has contributed greatly to the realization of England's plans. The second and most extensive emigration met Ireland after the Armistice in Kilkeny in May 1652, ie during the era of Oliver Cromwel. The third wave of emigration then caused the victory of William of Orange over James II. in the battle of the Boyne in 1690 and Aughrimu the 1691. Most Irish emigrants resorted to the Catholic powers, particularly Spain, France and Austria. They can be roughly divided into three groups. First it was the Catholic priests, mainly members of the Franciscan order....cs_CZ
uk.abstract.enThe work is focused on the fate of Irish emigration to Central Europe (the Habsburg monarchy) during the 16th and 17th centuries and its subsequent fate in this region. Particular attention is paid to the family of the Counts Taaffe, who especially in the 19th century significantly influenced politics in the Austrian Empire. Irish emigration in the 17th and 18th century can be divided into three major waves. The first hit after the defeat of Ireland Ulster insurgents in Kinsale. Local elites were not willing to accept a subordinate position and four years after the signing of. Mellifontské contract went 30 September 1607 more than ninety Ulstr for the most important nobles in exile. This "escape poke" had far-reaching consequences for Ireland and has contributed greatly to the realization of England's plans. The second and most extensive emigration met Ireland after the Armistice in Kilkeny in May 1652, ie during the era of Oliver Cromwel. The third wave of emigration then caused the victory of William of Orange over James II. in the battle of the Boyne in 1690 and Aughrimu the 1691. Most Irish emigrants resorted to the Catholic powers, particularly Spain, France and Austria. They can be roughly divided into three groups. First it was the Catholic priests, mainly members of the Franciscan order....en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication-placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakulta, Ústav světových dějincs_CZ


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