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Mammalian circadian clock in peripheral organs, molecular mechanism and entrainment
dc.contributor.advisorSumová, Alena
dc.creatorPolidarová, Lenka
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T14:45:55Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T14:45:55Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/5454
dc.description.abstractMammalian circadian clock in peripheral organs, molecular mechanism and entrainment The circadian system controls timing of behavioral and physiological processes in most organisms. In mammals, central oscillator is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Apart from the SCN, peripheral oscillators are located in numerous organs like liver, heart, lung, muscle, intestine etc. The central and peripheral oscillators need to be synchronized by external cues (Zeitgeber). The SCN coordinates and entrains the phase of the clocks in numerous peripheral tissues via neuronal and humoral signals. For the SCN, dominant synchronizer is external light-dark cycle. Peripheral oscillators are cell-autonomous, they could work also independently of the SCN as a consequence of a feeding cycle. The basic molecular core clock mechanism responsible for generating circadian rhythms in the central and peripheral clocks is composed of transcriptional/translational feedback loops between the clock genes and their protein products. The aim of the present thesis was to ascertain whether the clock gene and protein expressions exhibit circadian rhythms in the rat intestine and whether the core clock mechanism drives expression of a cell cycle regulator rWee1. Next aim was to reveal how the circadian...en_US
dc.languageČeštinacs_CZ
dc.language.isocs_CZ
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Přírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
dc.titlePeriferní cirkadiánní hodiny savců, jejich molekulární mechanismus a synchronizacecs_CZ
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2008
dcterms.dateAccepted2008-09-22
dc.description.departmentKatedra genetiky a mikrobiologiecs_CZ
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Genetics and Microbiologyen_US
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Scienceen_US
dc.description.facultyPřírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId52883
dc.title.translatedMammalian circadian clock in peripheral organs, molecular mechanism and entrainmenten_US
dc.contributor.refereeKuthan, Martin
dc.identifier.aleph000999588
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGenetika, molekulární biologie a virologiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGenetics, Molecular Biology and Virologyen_US
thesis.degree.programBiologiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programBiologyen_US
uk.thesis.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csPřírodovědecká fakulta::Katedra genetiky a mikrobiologiecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-enFaculty of Science::Department of Genetics and Microbiologyen_US
uk.faculty-name.csPřírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Scienceen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csPřFcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csGenetika, molekulární biologie a virologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enGenetics, Molecular Biology and Virologyen_US
uk.degree-program.csBiologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enBiologyen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.enMammalian circadian clock in peripheral organs, molecular mechanism and entrainment The circadian system controls timing of behavioral and physiological processes in most organisms. In mammals, central oscillator is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Apart from the SCN, peripheral oscillators are located in numerous organs like liver, heart, lung, muscle, intestine etc. The central and peripheral oscillators need to be synchronized by external cues (Zeitgeber). The SCN coordinates and entrains the phase of the clocks in numerous peripheral tissues via neuronal and humoral signals. For the SCN, dominant synchronizer is external light-dark cycle. Peripheral oscillators are cell-autonomous, they could work also independently of the SCN as a consequence of a feeding cycle. The basic molecular core clock mechanism responsible for generating circadian rhythms in the central and peripheral clocks is composed of transcriptional/translational feedback loops between the clock genes and their protein products. The aim of the present thesis was to ascertain whether the clock gene and protein expressions exhibit circadian rhythms in the rat intestine and whether the core clock mechanism drives expression of a cell cycle regulator rWee1. Next aim was to reveal how the circadian...en_US
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Přírodovědecká fakulta, Katedra genetiky a mikrobiologiecs_CZ
dc.identifier.lisID990009995880106986


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