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Rozvoj finančního sektoru a nerovnost bohatství: Panelová analýza
dc.contributor.advisorHorváth, Roman
dc.creatorMainka, Paul Kaspar
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-24T10:46:26Z
dc.date.available2021-02-24T10:46:26Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/124586
dc.description.abstractiv Abstract The understanding of the drivers of wealth inequality is still relatively limited, which is due to the hitherto rather scarce available data on wealth. In the wealth inequality theory, saving is a crucial determinant of wealth inequality, and therefore my thesis emphasizes saving, which I approximate by financial development. Through a relatively new wealth panel dataset, I dispose of data on the Gini coefficient of wealth for 129 countries over the period 2000 to 2018. I identify the likely most influential variables on wealth inequality from a broad pool of possible explanatory variables by employing lasso for fixed effects and subsequently quantify their effect through fixed effects modelling. I obtain robust results that globalisation and a business-friendly regulatory environment are associated with higher wealth inequality, while a higher labour force participation rate and stronger control of corruption are linked to lower inequality. Moreover, but slightly less robustly, I find that a greater depth of financial markets is associated with higher wealth inequality. Thus, I do not find clear empirical support for the prominent role of saving for wealth inequality which it is attributed in theory. Instead, non-financial variables appear to be more relevant. JEL Classification C33, E21, G51...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.titleFinancial Development and Wealth Inequality: A Panel Data Analysisen_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2021
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-03
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Economic Studiesen_US
dc.description.departmentInstitut ekonomických studiícs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.repId216060
dc.title.translatedRozvoj finančního sektoru a nerovnost bohatství: Panelová analýzacs_CZ
dc.contributor.refereeMareš, Jan
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics and Financeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEkonomie a financecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programEconomicsen_US
uk.thesis.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csFakulta sociálních věd::Institut ekonomických studiícs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-enFaculty of Social Sciences::Institute of Economic Studiesen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csEkonomie a financecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enEconomics and Financeen_US
uk.degree-program.csEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enEconomicsen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.eniv Abstract The understanding of the drivers of wealth inequality is still relatively limited, which is due to the hitherto rather scarce available data on wealth. In the wealth inequality theory, saving is a crucial determinant of wealth inequality, and therefore my thesis emphasizes saving, which I approximate by financial development. Through a relatively new wealth panel dataset, I dispose of data on the Gini coefficient of wealth for 129 countries over the period 2000 to 2018. I identify the likely most influential variables on wealth inequality from a broad pool of possible explanatory variables by employing lasso for fixed effects and subsequently quantify their effect through fixed effects modelling. I obtain robust results that globalisation and a business-friendly regulatory environment are associated with higher wealth inequality, while a higher labour force participation rate and stronger control of corruption are linked to lower inequality. Moreover, but slightly less robustly, I find that a greater depth of financial markets is associated with higher wealth inequality. Thus, I do not find clear empirical support for the prominent role of saving for wealth inequality which it is attributed in theory. Instead, non-financial variables appear to be more relevant. JEL Classification C33, E21, G51...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Institut ekonomických studiícs_CZ
thesis.grade.codeA
uk.publication-placePrahacs_CZ
uk.thesis.defenceStatusO


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