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dc.contributor
dc.creatorRadek Soběhart
dc.date2017
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dc.date.accessioned2018-05-28T11:05:33Z
dc.date.available2018-05-28T11:05:33Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierISSN 2336-7105
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/97424
dc.descriptionrubrika: Articles
dc.description
dc.descriptionThe paper describes the modern history of international relations based on the liberalism-constructivismapproach. The main goal is to decrease the importance of the state in international relationsand to point out the importance of a number of other actors that influence communication in internationalrelations (multinational companies, non-state actors, new social movements, media,etc.). Such expansion is also of importance for the Czechoslovak and West German relations in the1950s and 1960s. At that time, official diplomatic relations did not exist, therefore the communicationtranspired via these non-state actors. Scientific workplaces focusing on the area of internationalrelations played a key role in this process, namely the Czechoslovak Ústav pro mezinárodní politikua ekonomii and the West German Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik. However even these scientificinstitutions were influenced by the ideological and institutional settings of each respectivecountry. The Ústav pro mezinárodní politiku a ekonomii in many aspects simply repeated propagandastatements of the Communist government towards West Germany. Due to its own activities aimedat the Czechoslovak and West German relations in the 1960s and the effort to gain a more independentposition, it was disbanded in early 1970s. A new workplace was created instead, which was onceagain fully subordinate to the Communist party. On the other hand, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für AuswärtigePolitik represents a modern think-tank created in the Anglo-Saxon world. In many propositions,the analysis formed their own, independent stances that often contradicted the official viewsof the West German government.
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dc.publisherFilozofická fakulta Univerzity Karlovy
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dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
dc.sourcePrague Papers on the History of International Relations, 2017, 2, 71-91
dc.subjectinternational relations
dc.subjectnon-state actors
dc.subjectCzechoslowakia
dc.subjectCold War
dc.subjectWest Germany
dc.subjectinternational
dc.subjecthistory
dc.subjectthink-tanks
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dc.titleBedeutung nichtstaatlicher Akteurein den tschechoslowakisch-westdeutschenBeziehungen in den 1960er Jahren
dc.titleTHE IMPORTANCE OF NON-STATE ACTORS IN THE CZECHOSLOVAKAND WEST GERMAN RELATIONS IN 1960S
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dc.typeČlánekcs_CZ
dc.typeArticleen_US
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dc.description.startPage71
dc.description.endPage91
dcterms.isPartOf.namePrague Papers on the History of International Relationscs_CZ
dcterms.isPartOf.journalYear2017
dcterms.isPartOf.journalVolume2017
dcterms.isPartOf.journalIssue2


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