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dc.contributor
dc.creatorFerenc Szávai
dc.date2016
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dc.date.accessioned2018-05-28T11:05:06Z
dc.date.available2018-05-28T11:05:06Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierISSN 2336-7105
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/97072
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dc.descriptionThe dissolution and succession of federal states in the 20th century was heavily influenced by international legislation. If we view it from a methodological perspective, we can see that the dissolution of the Turkish Empire and the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy was regulated by the peace treaties ending the First World War. The matter was different with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia, because the Vienna agreements of international law provided legal measures. The Vienna Convention of 1978 concerns the succession and settlements of pastagreements. The Vienna Convention of 1983 deals with the succession of property and debt. In case of the breakup of a union (integration) it must remain a primary rule that the parties involved must reach an agreement on the distribution of property (archives) and debt. The pertaining Vienna agreement of 1983 has not yet come into force, and it is unlikely that it will in the foreseeable future. Despite the fact that the agreement is left to the parties, it would be desirable to regulate the process with legal means as well. In it, however, economic indicators must have an important role to play which we can see in the presented 20th century examples. On the other hand, political decisions are also present in the distribution of property and debt, in many cases at the expense of economic means. The regulation of the matter would be a common task, because it would prevent the uncertain outcomes of a series of forced decisions and agreements generating disputes just as we can witness their unregulation even today.
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dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakulta
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dc.rights
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dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
dc.sourcePrague Papers on the History of International Relations, 2016, 2, 139-148
dc.subjectHistory of Central Europe
dc.subjectState Succession
dc.subjectCommon Property
dc.subjectPublic Debt
dc.subjectInternational Law
dc.subjectVienna Conventions
dc.titleThe Methodology of State Succession in the 20th Century
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dc.typeČlánekcs_CZ
dc.typeArticleen_US
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dc.description.startPage139
dc.description.endPage148
dcterms.isPartOf.namePrague Papers on the History of International Relationscs_CZ
dcterms.isPartOf.journalYear2016
dcterms.isPartOf.journalVolume2016
dcterms.isPartOf.journalIssue2


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