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dc.contributor.authorBode, Christoph
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-29T10:29:54Z
dc.date.available2019-08-29T10:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2571-452X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/108689
dc.language.isoencs_CZ
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
dc.sourceLitteraria Pragensia, 2019, 57, 60-74cs_CZ
dc.source.urihttp://litteraria-pragensia.ff.cuni.cz
dc.titleGeorg Forster in Paris (1793/94)en_US
dc.typeČlánekcs_CZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
uk.abstract.enGeorg (also known as George or Georges) Forster was 12 when his first book came out, a translation into English of Lomonosov’s Chronological Abridgement of the Russian History (1760), “continued to the present Time by the Translator.” He was 17 when, together with his father Johann Reinhold Forster, he translated de Bougainville’s Voyage autour du monde into English (1771). He was 18 when he accompanied Captain Cook on his second voyage to the South Seas, 22 when he published the most remarkable account of that voyage of exploration, A Voyage Round the World (1777). Forster – whose works, according to Friedrich Schlegel, “breathe the spirit of free progression” like nobody else’s – was not only one of the finest scientists and ethnographers of the age, whose concept of a holistic geography, integrating natural and social sciences, would deeply influence his most prominent student, Alexander von Humboldt, he was also a polyglot cosmopolitan of hybrid and fluid national and cultural identities – and a supporter of the French Revolution. In 1793, he travelled to Paris to ask for the admittance of the short-lived Republic of Mainz to the French Republic, only to die under miserable circumstances a few months later, not yet 40. This essay focuses on his final months (he died in Paris on 10 January 1794) and on his acquaintances there (Théroigne de Méricourt and Bernardin de St. Pierre, for instance), including his relations with other expatriates, German or English (e.g., Helen Maria Williams and Mary Wollstonecraft). Forster is presented here as an intellectual with no affiliations or loyalties to any linguistic, ethnic or national community – a citizen of the world, obliged only to live a life in which he proves to be “worthy of himself.”cs_CZ
uk.internal-typeuk_publication


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