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dc.contributor.authorSzary-Matywiecka, Ewa
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-02T09:50:02Z
dc.date.available2022-11-02T09:50:02Z
dc.date.issued2022-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/177944
dc.description.abstractIn this book-length study, Ewa Szary-Matywiecka examines Maria Wirtemberska’s Malvina, or the Heart’s Intuition, an international success upon its publication in 1816 that is now widely considered to be Poland’s first psychological novel. Applying structuralist methods, Szary-Matywiecka situates Wirtemberska among other literary luminaries of her day, including Rousseau and Goethe, and explores how the nineteenth-century salon culture formed the concerns and themes of her novel. Malvina’s obsession with language games recall the vocabulary quizzes and semantic puzzles popular in the European salons frequented by Wirtemberska. Szary-Matywiecka also argues that the novel’s motif of twins and twinned characters emerges from both the theatrical preoccupations of salons, as well as how Wirtemberska seemingly splits her voice between traditional narration and a more intrusive authorial style, helping shape her novel’s innovative narrative method. Malvina, or Spoken Word in the Novel is an insightful deconstruction of a female-penned classic of European literature.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNakladatelství Karolinumcs_CZ
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/cs
dc.subjectliterary criticismen
dc.subjectliteratureen
dc.subjectlanguageen
dc.subjectslavic languagesen
dc.titleMalvina, or Spoken and Written Word in the Novelen
dc.typeknihacs_CZ
dc.typebooken_US
dcterms.extent169
uk.abstract.enIn this book-length study, Ewa Szary-Matywiecka examines Maria Wirtemberska’s Malvina, or the Heart’s Intuition, an international success upon its publication in 1816 that is now widely considered to be Poland’s first psychological novel. Applying structuralist methods, Szary-Matywiecka situates Wirtemberska among other literary luminaries of her day, including Rousseau and Goethe, and explores how the nineteenth-century salon culture formed the concerns and themes of her novel. Malvina’s obsession with language games recall the vocabulary quizzes and semantic puzzles popular in the European salons frequented by Wirtemberska. Szary-Matywiecka also argues that the novel’s motif of twins and twinned characters emerges from both the theatrical preoccupations of salons, as well as how Wirtemberska seemingly splits her voice between traditional narration and a more intrusive authorial style, helping shape her novel’s innovative narrative method. Malvina, or Spoken Word in the Novel is an insightful deconstruction of a female-penned classic of European literature.en
dc.publisher.publicationPlacePrahacs_CZ
dc.identifier.doi10.14712/9788024645209
oaire.fundingReference.awardNumber0205/NPRH4/H3a/83/2016cs
oaire.fundingReference.fundingStreamNarodowy Program Rozwoju Humanistykipl
dc.identifier.isbnPDF9788024645209


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