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dc.contributor.authorRoháček, Miloš
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-12T09:08:39Z
dc.date.available2019-12-12T09:08:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2336-8144
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/115517
dc.language.isoencs_CZ
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
dc.sourceStudia Hercynia, 2018, 22, 2, 52-82cs_CZ
dc.source.urihttps://studiahercynia.ff.cuni.cz
dc.subjectLate Bronze Agecs_CZ
dc.subjectmetalscs_CZ
dc.subjectAegeancs_CZ
dc.subjectWestern Anatoliacs_CZ
dc.subjectDodecanesecs_CZ
dc.subjectLevantcs_CZ
dc.subjectinterfacecs_CZ
dc.subjectswordcs_CZ
dc.subjectknifecs_CZ
dc.title‘A Marriage of the Aegean and the Orient’. Bronzes of the Siana Group Reconsideredcs_CZ
dc.typeVědecký článekcs_CZ
uk.abstract.enThe material culture of the so -called Eastern Aegean–Western Anatolian Interface during the Late Bronze Age has so far been analysed mainly through the prism of ceramic production and funerary evidence. Both of these classes of evidence indicate its special character. To test this proposition, this contribution focuses on a group of possibly indigenous metal finds. In particular, discussed here is the so -called Siana Group of flanged swords and knives with a characteristic narrow tang at the end of the handle. They were first categorised by Nancy Sandars in 1963 and show an interesting mixture of Aegean and Near Eastern typological traits. Both the Siana swords and the Siana knives occur almost exclusively in the Eastern Aegean–Western Anatolian Interface, although some of the knives have been found also outside this particular region. The Siana Group, originally dated to LH IIIB–IIIC, can now be more securely dated to the LH IIIA2–IIIB periods. It seems that most of these metals came from graves, while some knives were retrieved from settlement contexts as well. It is argued here that this group presents a unique local product of the area of the Eastern Aegean–Western Anatolian Interface, incorporating and transforming both Aegean and Near Eastern influences. Moreover, other examples of earlier or contemporary Western Anatolian finds of swords that have shapes that did not typically occur in the Aegean are presented here as well, as they illustrate the local background of weapon styles the LH II/III turn in the area.cs_CZ
uk.internal-typeuk_publication
dc.description.startPage52
dc.description.endPage82
dcterms.isPartOf.nameStudia Hercyniacs_CZ
dcterms.isPartOf.journalYear2018
dcterms.isPartOf.journalVolume22
dcterms.isPartOf.journalIssue2


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