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Faktory ovlivňující rozmanitost ptáků na altitudinálním gradientu Kamerunské hory
dc.contributor.advisorHořák, David
dc.creatorDjomo Nana, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-03T14:52:28Z
dc.date.available2019-05-03T14:52:28Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/79698
dc.description.abstractAltitudinal gradients constitute a powerful test system for understanding distribution of species around the globe. Tropical mountains are quite rich in species even after controlling for environmental productivity, and are ideally suited for studying patterns of species distributions because they have had sufficient time for species to produce a response to environmental changes that affect their life histories. In this thesis, I investigate basic ecological mechanisms potentially behind avian distribution patterns along an altitudinal gradient in West-Central Africa. I used data collected with four methodological approaches (point counts, mist netting, random walks and artificial nest experiments) along an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Cameroon from October 2011 to September 2013. This work is focused on two interrelated themes: selection pressures on life histories (Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4), and avian assemblage structures (Chapters 5 & 6). In the General Introduction, I present an overview of the study area with conservation implications of the study and my study objectives. In Chapters 1, 2 & 3, I investigate how selection pressures, i.e., nest predation and parasitism by haematozoa, affect bird assemblages. I used artificial nest experiments to assess nest predation rates in Chapters 1 & 2, and my...en_US
dc.description.abstractAltitudinal gradients constitute a powerful test system for understanding distribution of species around the globe. Tropical mountains are quite rich in species even after controlling for environmental productivity, and are ideally suited for studying patterns of species distributions because they have had sufficient time for species to produce a response to environmental changes that affect their life histories. In this thesis, I investigate basic ecological mechanisms potentially behind avian distribution patterns along an altitudinal gradient in West-Central Africa. I used data collected with four methodological approaches (point counts, mist netting, random walks and artificial nest experiments) along an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Cameroon from October 2011 to September 2013. This work is focused on two interrelated themes: selection pressures on life histories (Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4), and avian assemblage structures (Chapters 5 & 6). In the General Introduction, I present an overview of the study area with conservation implications of the study and my study objectives. In Chapters 1, 2 & 3, I investigate how selection pressures, i.e., nest predation and parasitism by haematozoa, affect bird assemblages. I used artificial nest experiments to assess nest predation rates in Chapters 1 & 2, and my...cs_CZ
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Přírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
dc.subjectdruhová bohatostcs_CZ
dc.subjectfunkční rozmanitostcs_CZ
dc.subjectnadmořská výškacs_CZ
dc.subjectAfrikacs_CZ
dc.subjectptačí společenstvacs_CZ
dc.subjectspecies richnessen_US
dc.subjectfunctional diversityen_US
dc.subjectelevationen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectavian assemblagesen_US
dc.titleDrivers of avian diversity on an altitudinal gradient of Mount Cameroonen_US
dc.typedizertační prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2015
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-09-11
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Ecologyen_US
dc.description.departmentKatedra ekologiecs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Scienceen_US
dc.description.facultyPřírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId114934
dc.title.translatedFaktory ovlivňující rozmanitost ptáků na altitudinálním gradientu Kamerunské horycs_CZ
dc.contributor.refereeŠálek, Miroslav
dc.contributor.refereeWaltert, Matthias
dc.identifier.aleph002026884
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.leveldoktorskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.discipline-cs_CZ
thesis.degree.discipline-en_US
thesis.degree.programEkologiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programEcologyen_US
uk.faculty-name.csPřírodovědecká fakultacs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Scienceen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csPřFcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.cs-cs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.en-en_US
uk.degree-program.csEkologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enEcologyen_US
thesis.grade.csProspěl/acs_CZ
thesis.grade.enPassen_US
uk.abstract.csAltitudinal gradients constitute a powerful test system for understanding distribution of species around the globe. Tropical mountains are quite rich in species even after controlling for environmental productivity, and are ideally suited for studying patterns of species distributions because they have had sufficient time for species to produce a response to environmental changes that affect their life histories. In this thesis, I investigate basic ecological mechanisms potentially behind avian distribution patterns along an altitudinal gradient in West-Central Africa. I used data collected with four methodological approaches (point counts, mist netting, random walks and artificial nest experiments) along an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Cameroon from October 2011 to September 2013. This work is focused on two interrelated themes: selection pressures on life histories (Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4), and avian assemblage structures (Chapters 5 & 6). In the General Introduction, I present an overview of the study area with conservation implications of the study and my study objectives. In Chapters 1, 2 & 3, I investigate how selection pressures, i.e., nest predation and parasitism by haematozoa, affect bird assemblages. I used artificial nest experiments to assess nest predation rates in Chapters 1 & 2, and my...cs_CZ
uk.abstract.enAltitudinal gradients constitute a powerful test system for understanding distribution of species around the globe. Tropical mountains are quite rich in species even after controlling for environmental productivity, and are ideally suited for studying patterns of species distributions because they have had sufficient time for species to produce a response to environmental changes that affect their life histories. In this thesis, I investigate basic ecological mechanisms potentially behind avian distribution patterns along an altitudinal gradient in West-Central Africa. I used data collected with four methodological approaches (point counts, mist netting, random walks and artificial nest experiments) along an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Cameroon from October 2011 to September 2013. This work is focused on two interrelated themes: selection pressures on life histories (Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4), and avian assemblage structures (Chapters 5 & 6). In the General Introduction, I present an overview of the study area with conservation implications of the study and my study objectives. In Chapters 1, 2 & 3, I investigate how selection pressures, i.e., nest predation and parasitism by haematozoa, affect bird assemblages. I used artificial nest experiments to assess nest predation rates in Chapters 1 & 2, and my...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Přírodovědecká fakulta, Katedra ekologiecs_CZ
thesis.grade.codeP


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