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dc.contributor.advisorRiegl, Martin
dc.creatorHoltschke, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T16:29:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-26T16:29:32Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/64113
dc.description.abstract(by Eric Holtschke) The end of the Cold War and thus the collapse of the Eastern Bloc was, in the words of Mary Farrell, "one of the late twentieth century's defining moments"1 : Communist rule in Central and Eastern Europe collapsed, opening up the road to democracy together with freedom of speech, freedom of thought and free elections, as well as free and independent movement of people. The end of the Cold War, which started as a direct result of the Second World War, came about by means of mass demonstrations, the first of which took place in Plauen (GDR) on 7 October 1989. Only a few months later, no-one could be sure how the world would develop. The so-called 'voice' was followed by 'exit' in the German Democratic Republic - and the Czechoslovakians were close to the events taking place in the embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Prague. The end of the autocratic system was followed by the process of democratisation, characterised by upheavals and the restructuring of political conditions. Free and independent elections marked the end of democratisation in both the German Democratic Republic and Czechoslovakia. The consolidation period was determined by the dissolution of both of the aforementioned countries, succeeded by 1) the absorption of the entirety of former East German...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.subjectPřechod k demokraciics_CZ
dc.subjectNěmecká demokratická republikacs_CZ
dc.subjectČeskoslovenskocs_CZ
dc.subjectČeská republikacs_CZ
dc.subjectSlovenskocs_CZ
dc.subjectkonsolidacecs_CZ
dc.subjectDemocratic transitionen_US
dc.subjectGDRen_US
dc.subjectCzechoslovakiaen_US
dc.subjectCzech Republicen_US
dc.subjectSlovakiaen_US
dc.subjectconsolidationen_US
dc.titleThe Democratic Transition of Czechoslovakia, the German Democratic Republic and their Successor States, with Particular Focus on the Geopolitical Framework after 1989en_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2014
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-26
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.description.departmentKatedra politologiecs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.repId136606
dc.contributor.refereeBrunclík, Miloš
dc.identifier.aleph001786550
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGeopolitická studiacs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineGeopolitical Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.programPolitologiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programPolitical Scienceen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csGeopolitická studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enGeopolitical Studiesen_US
uk.degree-program.csPolitologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enPolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.grade.csVelmi dobřecs_CZ
thesis.grade.enVery gooden_US
uk.abstract.en(by Eric Holtschke) The end of the Cold War and thus the collapse of the Eastern Bloc was, in the words of Mary Farrell, "one of the late twentieth century's defining moments"1 : Communist rule in Central and Eastern Europe collapsed, opening up the road to democracy together with freedom of speech, freedom of thought and free elections, as well as free and independent movement of people. The end of the Cold War, which started as a direct result of the Second World War, came about by means of mass demonstrations, the first of which took place in Plauen (GDR) on 7 October 1989. Only a few months later, no-one could be sure how the world would develop. The so-called 'voice' was followed by 'exit' in the German Democratic Republic - and the Czechoslovakians were close to the events taking place in the embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Prague. The end of the autocratic system was followed by the process of democratisation, characterised by upheavals and the restructuring of political conditions. Free and independent elections marked the end of democratisation in both the German Democratic Republic and Czechoslovakia. The consolidation period was determined by the dissolution of both of the aforementioned countries, succeeded by 1) the absorption of the entirety of former East German...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Katedra politologiecs_CZ


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