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dc.contributor.advisorBaxa, Jaromír
dc.creatorRadonjić, Marija
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T15:55:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-18T15:55:53Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/61156
dc.description.abstractThis study applies the cross-country growth accounting regressions derived from the augmented Solow-Swan model to ascertain the growth effects of education in CEE and Balkan countries. We firstly test whether the total stock or accumulation of education matters more for corresponding countries' growth and afterwards we decompose the total stock into educational stocks at primary, secondary and tertiary levels to test whether the disaggregated educational levels have different growth effects. We do so by applying the panel fixed effects technique on 17 CEE countries during the 1990-2010 period. In addition, we address the endogeneity of education by using the lags of different educational proxies as instruments. The results suggest that the average stock of education is significantly contributing to economic growth of CEE countries with the biggest growth effect of tertiary education. Regarding the Balkan countries only, the growth effect of education is almost a null. We conclude that one cannot have economic growth without a good educational system and efficient usage of human capital. Thus, the policy implications should be related to the proper identification of the quality of educational governance, problem of mismatch on labor market and better utilization of human capital. Keywords:...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectEconomic Growthen_US
dc.subjectCEE countriesen_US
dc.subjectBalkan countriesen_US
dc.subjectCross-Country Growth Accountingen_US
dc.subjectEndogeneityen_US
dc.titleThe Growth Effects of Education in CEE and Balkan Countriesen_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2014
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-01-28
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Economic Studiesen_US
dc.description.departmentInstitut ekonomických studiícs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.repId125709
dc.contributor.refereeCingl, Lubomír
dc.identifier.aleph001679072
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEkonomie a financecs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics and Financeen_US
thesis.degree.programEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.programEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
uk.thesis.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csFakulta sociálních věd::Institut ekonomických studiícs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-enFaculty of Social Sciences::Institute of Economic Studiesen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csEkonomie a financecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enEconomics and Financeen_US
uk.degree-program.csEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enEconomicsen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.enThis study applies the cross-country growth accounting regressions derived from the augmented Solow-Swan model to ascertain the growth effects of education in CEE and Balkan countries. We firstly test whether the total stock or accumulation of education matters more for corresponding countries' growth and afterwards we decompose the total stock into educational stocks at primary, secondary and tertiary levels to test whether the disaggregated educational levels have different growth effects. We do so by applying the panel fixed effects technique on 17 CEE countries during the 1990-2010 period. In addition, we address the endogeneity of education by using the lags of different educational proxies as instruments. The results suggest that the average stock of education is significantly contributing to economic growth of CEE countries with the biggest growth effect of tertiary education. Regarding the Balkan countries only, the growth effect of education is almost a null. We conclude that one cannot have economic growth without a good educational system and efficient usage of human capital. Thus, the policy implications should be related to the proper identification of the quality of educational governance, problem of mismatch on labor market and better utilization of human capital. Keywords:...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Institut ekonomických studiícs_CZ


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