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Les smíchu - hledání počátků emancipace literatury čínského starověku
dc.contributor.advisorLomová, Olga
dc.creatorBaccini, Giulia
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T21:15:34Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T21:15:34Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/34950
dc.description.abstractLiterary history, as established in 20th century China, mostly believed that Confucia conservatism had always oppressed and marginalized practices of "humour" in China.1 This view, formulated in early 20th century when anti-traditionalism prevailed among Chinese intellectuals, regarded entertaining practices as suppressed and suffocated by Confucian moralizing and at that time even the notion of "humour" itself was introduced to China using an English word (humour-youmo ).2 As a result, in sinology until recently the topic of "humour"3 in literature was - with only few exceptions - 4 perceived as marginal to the understanding of ancient Chinese society and culture (as very few works have been published on the topic of Chinese humour, which, though, do not bring valued insights to the topic).5 However, in early sources there are evidences of entertaining practices linked to humour, which can be traced back to Warring States period. The first step toward a reconsideration of the tradition could be due to the findings, particularly from the last decade (referring in particular to Guodian excavation in late 1993), of new textual materials which obliged the scholars to confront with a different reality of texts and thoughts (expressed by the texts) from that they have previously reconstructed. This led to a...cs_CZ
dc.description.abstractLiterary history, as established in 20th century China, mostly believed that Confucian conservatism had always oppressed and marginalized practices of "humour" in China.1 This view, formulated in early 20th century when anti-traditionalism prevailed among Chinese intellectuals, regarded entertaining practices as suppressed and suffocated by Confucian moralizing and at that time even the notion of "humour" itself was introduced to China using an English word (humour-youmo ).2 As a result, in sinology until recently the topic of "humour"3 in literature was - with only few exceptions - 4 perceived as marginal to the understanding of ancient Chinese society and culture (as very few works have been published on the topic of Chinese humour, which, though, do not bring valued insights to the topic).5 However, in early sources there are evidences of entertaining practices linked to humour, which can be traced back to Warring States period. The first step toward a reconsideration of the tradition could be due to the findings, particularly from the last decade (referring in particular to Guodian excavation in late 1993), of new textual materials which obliged the scholars to confront with a different reality of texts and thoughts (expressed by the texts) from that they have previously reconstructed. This led to a...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.titleThe Forest of Laughs (Xiaolin): mapping the offspring of self-aware literature in ancient Chinaen_US
dc.typedizertační prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2011
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-03-04
dc.description.departmentInstitute of South and Central Asiaen_US
dc.description.departmentÚstav jižní a centrální Asiecs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Artsen_US
dc.identifier.repId105106
dc.title.translatedLes smíchu - hledání počátků emancipace literatury čínského starověkucs_CZ
dc.contributor.refereeMaršálek, Jakub
dc.contributor.refereePaolillo, Maurizio
dc.identifier.aleph001744351
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.leveldoktorskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineLiteratures of Asia and Africaen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeorie a dějiny literatur zemí Asie a Afrikycs_CZ
thesis.degree.programPhilologyen_US
thesis.degree.programFilologiecs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.csFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Artsen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFFcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csTeorie a dějiny literatur zemí Asie a Afrikycs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enLiteratures of Asia and Africaen_US
uk.degree-program.csFilologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enPhilologyen_US
thesis.grade.csProspěl/acs_CZ
thesis.grade.enPassen_US
uk.abstract.csLiterary history, as established in 20th century China, mostly believed that Confucia conservatism had always oppressed and marginalized practices of "humour" in China.1 This view, formulated in early 20th century when anti-traditionalism prevailed among Chinese intellectuals, regarded entertaining practices as suppressed and suffocated by Confucian moralizing and at that time even the notion of "humour" itself was introduced to China using an English word (humour-youmo ).2 As a result, in sinology until recently the topic of "humour"3 in literature was - with only few exceptions - 4 perceived as marginal to the understanding of ancient Chinese society and culture (as very few works have been published on the topic of Chinese humour, which, though, do not bring valued insights to the topic).5 However, in early sources there are evidences of entertaining practices linked to humour, which can be traced back to Warring States period. The first step toward a reconsideration of the tradition could be due to the findings, particularly from the last decade (referring in particular to Guodian excavation in late 1993), of new textual materials which obliged the scholars to confront with a different reality of texts and thoughts (expressed by the texts) from that they have previously reconstructed. This led to a...cs_CZ
uk.abstract.enLiterary history, as established in 20th century China, mostly believed that Confucian conservatism had always oppressed and marginalized practices of "humour" in China.1 This view, formulated in early 20th century when anti-traditionalism prevailed among Chinese intellectuals, regarded entertaining practices as suppressed and suffocated by Confucian moralizing and at that time even the notion of "humour" itself was introduced to China using an English word (humour-youmo ).2 As a result, in sinology until recently the topic of "humour"3 in literature was - with only few exceptions - 4 perceived as marginal to the understanding of ancient Chinese society and culture (as very few works have been published on the topic of Chinese humour, which, though, do not bring valued insights to the topic).5 However, in early sources there are evidences of entertaining practices linked to humour, which can be traced back to Warring States period. The first step toward a reconsideration of the tradition could be due to the findings, particularly from the last decade (referring in particular to Guodian excavation in late 1993), of new textual materials which obliged the scholars to confront with a different reality of texts and thoughts (expressed by the texts) from that they have previously reconstructed. This led to a...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication-placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakulta, Ústav jižní a centrální Asiecs_CZ
thesis.grade.codeP


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