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dc.contributor.advisorLevrincová, Petra
dc.creatorLevely, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T19:28:20Z
dc.date.available2017-04-19T19:28:20Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/23154
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the role of transnational corporations in preventing human rights abuse and conflict, along with the limits to proactive strategies and engagement with host governments. It concludes by applying these principles in a case study: the oil and gas industry in Burma. The issue is approached both practically and theoretically from economic, legal and political approaches. In some cases it is possible for companies to avoid or mitigate risks by adopting proactive strategies that might included training and community development programs. A firm that recognizes these issues and adopts a socially responsible strategy may justify their presence in a given country based on the overall effect it has, despite some negative consequences, such as financing a corrupt regime. Furthermore, it can be assumed in many cases that a firm that withdraws will quickly be replaced by another firm, which may be less sensitive to these concerns. Based on these grounds, a company might argue that their presence in a country where the government does not respect human rights represents constructive engagement with the host country's regime. While this line of reasoning is certainly valid, and while this strategy is feasible in some cases, there are certain boundaries that firms should not cross. Firstly, any...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.titleConstructive Engagement or Illegal Investment?en_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2009
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-06-25
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.description.departmentKatedra politologiecs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId74578
dc.contributor.refereeRiegl, Martin
dc.identifier.aleph002081966
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.programMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
thesis.degree.programInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
uk.thesis.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csFakulta sociálních věd::Katedra politologiecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-enFaculty of Social Sciences::Department of Political Scienceen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
uk.degree-program.csMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.enThis thesis examines the role of transnational corporations in preventing human rights abuse and conflict, along with the limits to proactive strategies and engagement with host governments. It concludes by applying these principles in a case study: the oil and gas industry in Burma. The issue is approached both practically and theoretically from economic, legal and political approaches. In some cases it is possible for companies to avoid or mitigate risks by adopting proactive strategies that might included training and community development programs. A firm that recognizes these issues and adopts a socially responsible strategy may justify their presence in a given country based on the overall effect it has, despite some negative consequences, such as financing a corrupt regime. Furthermore, it can be assumed in many cases that a firm that withdraws will quickly be replaced by another firm, which may be less sensitive to these concerns. Based on these grounds, a company might argue that their presence in a country where the government does not respect human rights represents constructive engagement with the host country's regime. While this line of reasoning is certainly valid, and while this strategy is feasible in some cases, there are certain boundaries that firms should not cross. Firstly, any...en_US
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Katedra politologiecs_CZ
dc.identifier.lisID990020819660106986


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