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dc.contributor.advisorDrulák, Petr
dc.creatorHays II, George Waight Secrest
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T19:28:07Z
dc.date.available2017-04-19T19:28:07Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/23153
dc.description.abstractThis work is a discursive analysis exploring the effects of US presidential Cold War speech on the identification of the "Enemy." It examines the usage of metaphors in key speeches from Truman, Eisenhower, Reagan, and G.H.W. Bush in order to determine the composition and evolution of the identity of the Cold War "Enemy." This identity is then compared and contrasted to that created by the usage of metaphors concerning the War on Terror by G.W. Bush. The theory of discursive analysis used in this work stems from beginnings in philosophy several decades old. Over time, the theory of discursive analysis was honed towards many different schools and areas of study. The specific branch which this work springs from holds that language shapes political and physical reality. Coming out of this theory, this work aims to explore whether or not exposure to Cold War rhetoric had an impact over time between different administrations as well as between different conflicts. The method of analysis is an adaptation of previous methods of metaphorical analysis. Eight general conceptual metaphors are chosen as a guiding structure throughout all of the speeches. Corresponding metaphorical expressions are then gathered according to the conceptual metaphor being analyzed. The frequency of metaphorical expressions, and the...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.titleThe Effects of Cold War Speech in the Post-Cold War World: Identification of the Enemy in the War on Terroren_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2009
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-06-25
dc.description.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.description.departmentKatedra politologiecs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId74577
dc.contributor.refereeBeneš, Vít
dc.identifier.aleph002082283
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelnavazující magisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.programMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
thesis.degree.programInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
uk.degree-program.csMezinárodní ekonomická a politická studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enInternational Economic and Political Studiesen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.enThis work is a discursive analysis exploring the effects of US presidential Cold War speech on the identification of the "Enemy." It examines the usage of metaphors in key speeches from Truman, Eisenhower, Reagan, and G.H.W. Bush in order to determine the composition and evolution of the identity of the Cold War "Enemy." This identity is then compared and contrasted to that created by the usage of metaphors concerning the War on Terror by G.W. Bush. The theory of discursive analysis used in this work stems from beginnings in philosophy several decades old. Over time, the theory of discursive analysis was honed towards many different schools and areas of study. The specific branch which this work springs from holds that language shapes political and physical reality. Coming out of this theory, this work aims to explore whether or not exposure to Cold War rhetoric had an impact over time between different administrations as well as between different conflicts. The method of analysis is an adaptation of previous methods of metaphorical analysis. Eight general conceptual metaphors are chosen as a guiding structure throughout all of the speeches. Corresponding metaphorical expressions are then gathered according to the conceptual metaphor being analyzed. The frequency of metaphorical expressions, and the...en_US
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, Katedra politologiecs_CZ


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