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dc.contributor.advisorOrtmann, Andreas
dc.creatorKrajč, Marian
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T17:02:10Z
dc.date.available2018-10-02T17:02:10Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/21561
dc.description.abstractMarian Krajc Abstract The first chapter offers a theoretical model that suggests an alternative explanation to the so- called unskilled-and-unaware problem - the unskilled overestimate their skills while the skilled underestimate (but less than the unskilled). The unskilled-and-unaware problem was experimentally identified about a decade ago and numerous authors have elaborated on this problem since. We propose that the alleged unskilled-and-unaware problem, rather than being one of biased judgments, is a signal extraction problem that differs for the skilled and the unskilled. The model is based on two assumptions. First, we assume that skills are distributed according to a J-distribution, which can be regarded as an approximation of the very right tail of the IQ distribution. This assumption is reasonable given the typical subject pool used in the experimental studies of overconfidence - students from prominent US universities. Second, we assume an error term in own-ability perception, which is a common assumption in psychology models. Our simple model generates, by means of analytical computations, patterns similar to those identified in the previous experimental literature. We also discuss conditions under which the unskilled-and-unaware problem should disappear. The second chapter reports the results...cs_CZ
dc.description.abstractThe first chapter offers a theoretical model that suggests an alternative explanation to the so-called unskilled-and-unaware problem-the unskilled overestimate their skills while the skilled underestimate (but less than the unskilled). The unskilled-and-unaware problem was experimentally identified about a decade ago and numerous authors have elaborated on this problem since. We propose that the alleged unskilled-and-unaware problem, rather than being one of biased judgments, is a signal extraction problem that differs for the skilled and the unskilled. The model is based on two assumptions. First, we assume that skills are distributed according to a J-distribution, which can be regarded as an approximation of the very right tail of the IQ distribution. This assumption is reasonable given the typical subject pool used in the experimental studies of overconfidence - students from prominent US universities. Second, we assume an error term in own-ability perception, which is a common assumption in psychology models. Our simple model generates, by means of analytical computations, patterns similar to those identified in the previous experimental literature. We also discuss conditions under which the unskilled-and-unaware problem should disappear. The second chapter reports the results of three experiments (one...en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.titleOverconfidence in Business, Economics, Finance, and Psychology: How much of a Problem is it?en_US
dc.typedizertační prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2009
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-06-04
dc.description.departmentCERGEcs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.description.facultyFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId78957
dc.contributor.refereeHoelzl, Erik
dc.contributor.refereeFellner, Gerlinde
dc.identifier.aleph002065887
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.leveldoktorskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEkonomiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programEconomic Theoryen_US
uk.thesis.typedizertační prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csFakulta sociálních věd::CERGEcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.csFakulta sociálních vědcs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFSVcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csEkonomiecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enEconomicsen_US
uk.degree-program.csEkonomické teoriecs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enEconomic Theoryen_US
thesis.grade.csProspěl/acs_CZ
thesis.grade.enPassen_US
uk.abstract.csMarian Krajc Abstract The first chapter offers a theoretical model that suggests an alternative explanation to the so- called unskilled-and-unaware problem - the unskilled overestimate their skills while the skilled underestimate (but less than the unskilled). The unskilled-and-unaware problem was experimentally identified about a decade ago and numerous authors have elaborated on this problem since. We propose that the alleged unskilled-and-unaware problem, rather than being one of biased judgments, is a signal extraction problem that differs for the skilled and the unskilled. The model is based on two assumptions. First, we assume that skills are distributed according to a J-distribution, which can be regarded as an approximation of the very right tail of the IQ distribution. This assumption is reasonable given the typical subject pool used in the experimental studies of overconfidence - students from prominent US universities. Second, we assume an error term in own-ability perception, which is a common assumption in psychology models. Our simple model generates, by means of analytical computations, patterns similar to those identified in the previous experimental literature. We also discuss conditions under which the unskilled-and-unaware problem should disappear. The second chapter reports the results...cs_CZ
uk.abstract.enThe first chapter offers a theoretical model that suggests an alternative explanation to the so-called unskilled-and-unaware problem-the unskilled overestimate their skills while the skilled underestimate (but less than the unskilled). The unskilled-and-unaware problem was experimentally identified about a decade ago and numerous authors have elaborated on this problem since. We propose that the alleged unskilled-and-unaware problem, rather than being one of biased judgments, is a signal extraction problem that differs for the skilled and the unskilled. The model is based on two assumptions. First, we assume that skills are distributed according to a J-distribution, which can be regarded as an approximation of the very right tail of the IQ distribution. This assumption is reasonable given the typical subject pool used in the experimental studies of overconfidence - students from prominent US universities. Second, we assume an error term in own-ability perception, which is a common assumption in psychology models. Our simple model generates, by means of analytical computations, patterns similar to those identified in the previous experimental literature. We also discuss conditions under which the unskilled-and-unaware problem should disappear. The second chapter reports the results of three experiments (one...en_US
uk.file-availabilityV
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Fakulta sociálních věd, CERGEcs_CZ
thesis.grade.codeP
dc.identifier.lisID990020658870106986


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