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Venisanchova hrobka v Sakkáře a Chicagu
dc.contributor.advisorBárta, Miroslav
dc.creatorOnderka, Pavel
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T09:38:52Z
dc.date.available2017-04-13T09:38:52Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11956/19000
dc.description.abstractIn 1908, Edward E. Ayer (1841-1927),1 the founding father of the Egyptian collection of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL, purchased for the museum two chapels of Old Kingdom mastabas once located in the vicinity of the pyramid complex of Netjerykhet at central Saqqara. One of them belonged to Netjeruser (NTr-wsr),2 a high official from the later reign of Nyuserre till that of Menkauhor,3 the other to Unisankh (Wnjs-anx.w), who is generally considered to have been son of Unis, the last king of the Fifth Dynasty. The tomb of Unisankh was excavated in 1907 by James E. Quibell (1867-1935),4 then the chief inspector at Saqqara, for the purpose of its sale to the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago (the later Field Museum of Natural History).5 When Quibell started his excavations, the whole Unis Cemetery North- West was hidden under sand. In the course of excavating the site, Quibell cleared the tomb of Unisankh. He undoubtedly realized the existence of several other structures, in particular the tomb of Iynefert that was partly unearthed in the course of dismantling the neighboring tomb of Unisankh. One block from the mastaba of queen Nebet (Nbt), wife of Unis, was found as well.6en_US
dc.languageEnglishcs_CZ
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.titleThe tomb of Unisankh at Saqqara and Chicagoen_US
dc.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
dcterms.created2009
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-02-03
dc.description.departmentCzech Institute of Egyptologyen_US
dc.description.departmentČeský egyptologický ústavcs_CZ
dc.description.facultyFaculty of Artsen_US
dc.description.facultyFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
dc.identifier.repId27540
dc.title.translatedVenisanchova hrobka v Sakkáře a Chicagucs_CZ
dc.contributor.refereeBareš, Ladislav
dc.identifier.aleph001112154
thesis.degree.nameMgr.
thesis.degree.levelmagisterskécs_CZ
thesis.degree.disciplineAfrican Studies - Egyptologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAfrikanistika - Egyptologiecs_CZ
thesis.degree.programHumanitiesen_US
thesis.degree.programHumanitní studiacs_CZ
uk.thesis.typediplomová prácecs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-csFilozofická fakulta::Český egyptologický ústavcs_CZ
uk.taxonomy.organization-enFaculty of Arts::Czech Institute of Egyptologyen_US
uk.faculty-name.csFilozofická fakultacs_CZ
uk.faculty-name.enFaculty of Artsen_US
uk.faculty-abbr.csFFcs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.csAfrikanistika - Egyptologiecs_CZ
uk.degree-discipline.enAfrican Studies - Egyptologyen_US
uk.degree-program.csHumanitní studiacs_CZ
uk.degree-program.enHumanitiesen_US
thesis.grade.csVýborněcs_CZ
thesis.grade.enExcellenten_US
uk.abstract.enIn 1908, Edward E. Ayer (1841-1927),1 the founding father of the Egyptian collection of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL, purchased for the museum two chapels of Old Kingdom mastabas once located in the vicinity of the pyramid complex of Netjerykhet at central Saqqara. One of them belonged to Netjeruser (NTr-wsr),2 a high official from the later reign of Nyuserre till that of Menkauhor,3 the other to Unisankh (Wnjs-anx.w), who is generally considered to have been son of Unis, the last king of the Fifth Dynasty. The tomb of Unisankh was excavated in 1907 by James E. Quibell (1867-1935),4 then the chief inspector at Saqqara, for the purpose of its sale to the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago (the later Field Museum of Natural History).5 When Quibell started his excavations, the whole Unis Cemetery North- West was hidden under sand. In the course of excavating the site, Quibell cleared the tomb of Unisankh. He undoubtedly realized the existence of several other structures, in particular the tomb of Iynefert that was partly unearthed in the course of dismantling the neighboring tomb of Unisankh. One block from the mastaba of queen Nebet (Nbt), wife of Unis, was found as well.6en_US
uk.publication.placePrahacs_CZ
uk.grantorUniverzita Karlova, Filozofická fakulta, Český egyptologický ústavcs_CZ
dc.identifier.lisID990011121540106986


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